Rothbard: The Constitution Was a Coup d’État

Our Republic was corrupted before the paint had time to dry…

“Basically, urban merchants and artisans, as well as many slaveholding planters, united in support of a strong nation-state that would use the power of coercion to grant them privileges and subsidies. The subsidies would come at the expense of the average subsistence yeoman farmer who might be expected to oppose such a new nationalism. But against them, to support a new constitution, were the commercial farmers aided by the southern plantation-farmers who also wanted power and regulation for their own benefit. Given the urban support, the split among the farmers, and the support from wealthy educated elites, it is not surprising that the nationalist forces were able to execute their truly amazing political coup d’état which illegally liquidated the Articles of Confederation and replaced it with the Constitution. In short, they were able to destroy the original individualist and decentralized program of the American Revolution. (p. 128)”

Source: Rothbard: The Constitution Was a Coup d’État | Mises Wire

Foreign Policy – Jacob Hornberger for President

 

The United States was founded on the principle of a non-interventionist foreign policy, one in which the federal government does not go abroad “in search of monsters to destroy.” That was the title of a speech delivered to Congress by John Quincy Adams on the Fourth of July, 1821, in which Adams summarized America’s founding foreign-policy principle of non-interventionism.

Adams observed that there are lots of monstrous conditions under which people around the world suffer — tyranny, oppression, war, revolution, starvation. It was not the role of the U.S. government, however, to go abroad and save people from such horrors.

Continue reading

Three Women Who Launched a Movement

 

The birth of the modern American libertarian movement can arguably be traced to the work of three women.

The battle, history has since shown, is not yet lost, and this is due in no small part to Rand, Paterson, and Lane’s belief in the power of ideas. Unconstrained by conventional political categories, they savaged the collectivist economic nostrums of the left even while, in their lives and careers, they exploded the rigid gender roles seen as sacrosanct by so many on the right. In the process, they laid the foundations of the modern libertarian movement.

Source: Three Women Who Launched a Movement

Thoreau And Civil Disobedience

‘All machines have their friction,’ Thoreau admitted, but when injustice is too great, you should ‘let your life be a counter-friction to stop the machine.’

In March 1845, the United States acquired a new president – James K. Polk – a forceful, aggressive political outsider intent on strengthening his country and asserting its pre-eminence in front of other world powers, especially Mexico and Great Britain. Within a year of his inauguration, he had declared full-scale war on Mexico because of squabbles over the Texan border, and was soon rattling his saber at Britain over the ownership of Oregon. To complete the picture, Polk was a vigorous defender of slavery, who dismissed the arguments of abolitionists as naive and sentimental.

Polk was a popular president, admired by many for his gung-ho manner, but a sizeable minority of the citizenry disliked him intensely. One especially committed opponent was a writer from Massachusetts called Henry David Thoreau. Thoreau is now a canonical American literary figure, studied in every high school for his lyrical masterpiece, Walden. But there is another, more political side to Thoreau, now usually air-brushed out of the story, which came to the fore in relation to the President.

Thoreau quickly realised he was opposed to everything Polk stood for: he hated what became the Mexican-American war, instinctively siding with the losing Mexican side, was wary of Polk’s squabbles with Britain and was appalled by the administration’s policy of hunting down and returning runaway slaves to their masters in the South.

Enjoy the rest via… http://www.thebookoflife.org/thoreau-and-civil-disobedience/

America’s Radical History Revealed – Part One

orange-sunshine

This post is the first in a series called “America’s Radical History Revealed”, which will highlight radical reformers, rebels and non-conformists of every stripe… holy men and hell raisers, saints and sinners; I cast no judgements. People such as these have changed the world and always have. I celebrate their passion and dedication to setting minds and souls free. You can and should decide for yourself.

The following is a short excerpt from an article called, “Retracing the Steps of Psychedelic Outlaws on an LSD Mission From God”, written by  and published by KQED public media in Northern California…

It sounds like the plot to a Paul Thomas Anderson movie: a cult of Southern California surfers worships LSD as a deity in the early ’60s, becoming so obsessed with spreading psychedelics to the masses that they move their families in together and form a church.

Church members engineer an international smuggling ring to bring hash, pot, and acid back from sources in Europe and Afghanistan. They trick out their vans and surfboards with secret compartments to hide the contraband from border agents. They launder their money through an art gallery in Laguna Beach, build an LSD lab in Palm Springs, and are ultimately responsible for distributing over 100 million hits of acid.

What’s being described here is no fiction. It’s the very real — and very colorful — story of The Brotherhood of Eternal Love, the subject of Orange Sunshine, an excellent new documentary by director William A. Kirkley.